Category Archives: Press / Media

Amped Software is one of EMEA’s Fastest-Growing Technology Companies

We are proud to announce that Amped Software ranked on the Deloitte Technology Fast 500 EMEA.

The Deloitte Technology Fast 500 program, now in its seventeenth year, is an objective
industry ranking that recognizes the fastest-growing technology companies in EMEA. This
year’s list featured 18 countries, including Belgium, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the
Netherlands, Turkey and the UK. This year’s winners were selected based on percentage
fiscal-year revenue growth from 2013 to 2016. Amped Software placed 5th in the local
ranking of the fastest growing technology companies in Italy.

“As founder of Amped Software, I am really proud that we have been acknowledged as
one of EMEA’s and Italy’s fastest growing companies in 2017. When I started the
company, I set a single objective: to develop the worldwide industry leading software for all
image and video processing needs for forensics and investigations,” said Amped Software
Founder and CEO, Martino Jerian. “The challenge was to create something unique for a
very specific type of client, aiming to be the best in the world. It was a very ambitious goal
and certainly a bit crazy, but clear and simple. And here we are today! A big thank you to
the team that believed in my vision and allowed me to develop it to the fullest.” Continue reading

Investigating Image Authenticity

This article, published in Evidence Technology Magazine, takes a look at two cases involving the authentication of digital images and the importance of the questions asked of the analyst during those investigations. It looks at how authentication software, such as Amped Authenticate has been designed with a structured workflow, to locate the puzzle pieces required to assist in answering those questions.

Read the full article here.

Only a matter of time until fake evidence leads to false convictions

With the rise of the digital age can experts trust that photographic evidence is legitimate?

Sophie Garrod, from Police Oracle, writes about how a growing number of forensic and counter-terrorism units are getting on board with pioneering image authentication software.

Approximately a third of UK forces have invested in Amped Software products – including Amped Authenticate, an all in one computer programme which can detect doctored images.

Forensic image departments, counter-terrorism units, and government departments say they are saving time and money by sending detectives on a short training course in the software.

Read the full article here to learn more.

Retrieving Evidence from CCTV

Acquiring evidence from a digital camera or a smartphone is more or less relatively easy to do. Images are usually in standard JPEG format and videos in MP4 or some other format that most players can read. But what is the best way to retrieve and handle CCTV footage to ensure it stands up to the scrutiny in the courtroom? There are numerous possibilities and it depends on where the video is actually recorded.

To learn more, read the article by Martino Jerian, Amped CEO and Founder, published in Lawyer Monthly.

Seeing Beyond the Image

Martino Jerian, Amped CEO and Founder, examines context, content, and format of images. From the images and the context in which they are used we can obtain a lot of information that is not visible with the naked eye, and for what is visible with the naked eye, can we trust it? The process of authenticating an image is a mix of technical and investigative elements. This article looks at how to perform a complete image analysis.

Read the article published in the Digital Forensics magazine.

The Importance of Using Images as Evidence

How many cases have you worked on lately that involved video footage or a photo as evidence? Are you really sure everything possible has been done regarding the proper use of those images for investigations and if they have been exploited to their full potential? Are you really sure that images and videos have been properly validated and are not the result of some tampering? Was the image of sufficient quality to prove or disprove some testimony? Has the image and video been analyzed by an expert with the proper tools?

These, and many more, are the question we will try to answer in our monthly column in the Lawyer Monthly magazine.

There’s a lot to know and to discuss, and in this brief overview we don’t expect you to become an expert, but at least we hope to point you in the right direction for further study.

Read the first issue:  The Importance of Using Images as Evidence

Exposing fraudulent digital images

As a predominantly visual species, we tend to believe what we see. Throughout human evolution, our primary sense of sight has allowed us to analyse primeval threats. We are genetically hardwired to process and trust what our eyes tell us.

This innate hardwiring means that the arrival of digital images has posed a problem for the fraud investigation community. There are many different reasons why someone would want to
maliciously alter a photo to ‘tell a different story’. Although photos can be manipulated with ease, many people still harbour a natural tendency to trust photos as a true and accurate representation of the scene in front of us.

The article published in Computer Fraud & Security describes how images may be altered and the techniques and processes we can use to spot photos that have been modified. With the right tools and training, exposing doctored images in fraud investigations is now not only financially and technically viable, but urgently necessary.

Read the full article here

Trust? Can you really trust and image?

Some time ago, two images featured prominently in the initial reporting of Hurricane Harvey. The first was of a shark swimming along the Houston freeway. The second showed several airplanes virtually underwater at what was claimed to be Houston airport. These iconic images were circulated widely on Twitter and were featured on mainstream national media such as Fox News. There was just one small problem. Neither of them were real!

This situation prompts an important question. If this behaviour is widespread on social and traditional media then how do we know it isn’t also affecting police and court investigations? After all, if members of the public are prepared to manipulate images for the sake of a few likes and retweets, what will they be prepared to resort to when the stakes are much higher?

Read the full article published on Police Life.

Can you trust what you show in Court?

If you present an object, an image, or a story to a courtroom, you must be able to trust that it is accurate.

How then, do you trust an image – a digital photograph, a snapshot in time of an object, a person or a scene? Do you trust what the photographer says? Or do you check it? Do you attempt to identify any signs of manipulation that could cast doubt on the weight of the evidence?

How many members of the public are aware of the Digital Imaging Procedure? What about the guidance surrounding computer based information, which includes digital images and video? What about the person that is receiving that file? Perhaps the investigating officer. Are they aware of the importance of image authentication?

Is the Criminal Justice System naive to believe that fake images do not end up being displayed in court and presented as truth? Even if it is a rarity now, we need to think of the future. To start with, we must ask ourselves, “Can we rely on the image we see before us? Has it been authenticated?”

Read the article published by The Barrister magazine to learn about the importance of authenticating images before submitting them as evidence.

From cameras to the court: How to make full video integration a reality

David Spreadborough, international trainer at Amped Software, and a regular expert witness in criminal investigations, charts the technical history of bringing CCTV images to court and provides an insight into the challenges associated with preparing surveillance images as evidence.

Read the article published on IFSEC Global