Introducing the new “Amped Replay Tutorials: How do I do this?” Blog Post Series!

Dear friends, welcome back! Last week we said farewell to the Video Evidence Pitfall blog series, but of course we’re not leaving you alone! And so, here we are with a brand new series called “Amped Replay Tutorials: How do I do this?“. We’ll try to address simple tasks that people working with video face almost daily. Keep reading for more info!

No need to lie: since search engines became so good, we just search the web for answering many everyday questions. This is of course good, but only if you are able to select a suitable and reliable source of information. “Suitable” means that your source is appropriate for the scenario from which your question arose: the same source could indeed be just fine for some cases, but inappropriate for others. For example, many websites provide good advice for a “healthy diet”, but you would certainly go to a specialist if you suffer from a disease for which the diet is important. “Reliability” means that you can trust what the source says. Okay, so why such a philosophical intro?

As we’ve seen in the previous series, dealing with videos for forensic and investigations brings up MANY questions. Some complex, some simple. Imagine you need to rotate a video that is upside down, or trim a part of it, or fix its aspect ratio since objects look stretched, or enlarge it. How do you do this? If we’re talking about your holiday videos, whatever solution Google brings to you would likely be OK. But if those videos are part of an investigation, then it gets much, much harder to find suitable and reliable answers!

With this new post series, we want to provide solutions to many simple questions and show how you handle them with Amped Replay. If you’re reading this blog, you probably know Amped Software: we equipped and trained thousands of law enforcement officers all around the world. We’ve been dealing with forensic image and video processing for years, we’ve seen changes coming and new challenges arriving, and we want to share some of our know-how with you! We hope you’ll find us to be a suitable and reliable source for image and video forensics đŸ™‚

In the next weeks, we’ll be dedicating several posts to each step of the classical video forensic workflow: playback, basic enhancement, annotation, export. For expert users, some posts could look a bit straightforward, but keep them as a good reference for your less trained colleagues!

That’s all for today! We hope you’ve found this issue of the “How Do I Do This?” series interesting and useful! Stay tuned and don’t miss the next ones. You can also follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook: we’ll post a link to every new tip so you won’t miss any!