Author Archives: Matthew Cook

We’re off to the Digital Investigations Conference & Exhibition in New Delhi

Join Amped, together with our partner Forensics Guru, at our first ever exhibition in India at the Digital Investigations Conference & Exhibition (DICE 2017). Visit the Amped Software booth for live demos of our image and video enhancement and authentication solutions.

When: 25 February 2017

Where: Silver Oak, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi Road, New Delhi, India

DICE is the only event in India focused on the digital investigations and forensics community. Attended by law enforcement agencies, government bodies, and companies with a direct interest in digital investigation technologies, the DICE event this year will be inaugurated by Mr. PP Chaudhary, Union Minister of State, Ministry of Law and Justice; and Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology, Government of India. This active government participation further underscores the emphasis that the Indian government lays on digital investigation technologies.

The manifold increase in the use of CCTV’s and video recording equipment in the Indian subcontinent has led to greater availability of video footage as evidence of crimes. Amped Software’s tools are uniquely positioned to provide insight into this video footage with the perspective of enhancing the output to be able to better ascertain the video contents from an investigation perspective. This is a crucial input from the perspective of law enforcement agencies and corporate security teams alike.

Amped Workshops at FT-Day 2016, Karlsruhe Germany

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One of our newest partners, MH Service GmbH has invited us to take part in their 2016 Forensic Technology Day (FT-Day).

As in the past years, the FT-Day will be hosted in the Conference Center 2.0, Egon-Eiermann-Allee 8 in Karlsruhe. The event will take place from Sept. 28th to 29th, 2016. FT-Day is the only event in Europe that focuses 100% on IT Forensics.

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Amped at Digital Experience 2016 with a New Cast and at a New Location

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The annual Digital Experience 2016 conference, hosted by our partner DataExpert, will be held this year on Tuesday, September 20 and Wednesday, September 21, at the Veenendaal Hotel, Netherlands.

This conference is organized for digital investigation professionals, fraud analysts, security officers, and IT-mangers, but also for Security Engineers, SOC/CERT-managers, Compliance Officers, Data Protection Officers and anyone interested in digital fraud investigations, Cyber Security, Incident response and/or Data Intelligence & Analysis.

This year, Amped Software is sending our international trainer, David Spreadborough (Spreadys), who will be conducting a workshop titled “Video – Fact or Fiction”, scheduled on Wednesday from 11:45 – 12:45. In this workshop, Spreadys will speak about the importance of correctly acquiring, analyzing and enhancing video and images within a legal environment.

We will also have a booth set up during this event. So stop by to meet the Amped team, to get a personal demo of our products, or to get answers to any of your questions.

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

Amped Software in Africa

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Amped Software heads to Africa to break ground in the emerging economies of Eastern Africa.

SecProTec East Africa is being held at the KICC (Kenyatta International Convention Center) from the 15th to the 17th of September. 

If you would like a personal demonstration of our solutions, or if you would like to explore partnership opportunities with us, we welcome you to visit our booth B31 where we will be exhibiting with our South African Partner Risk Diversion.

SecProTec East Africa powered by Intersec is the most important trade fair for the security, safety and protection industry in the entire East African region.
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Meet Amped Software at Security and Policing 2016

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Visit our booth (B23) at Security and Policing 2016!

The event will take place at Farnborough FIVE (Farnborough International Venue & Events), Hampshire, UK from Tuesday 8 – Thursday 10 March 2016.

We will be giving a presentation on Wednesday the 9th from 13:30 – 13:50 in the Cyber Zone of the event.

 Title: “Practical forensic image and video analysis”

Presenter: Martino Jerian, CEO and Founder.

This presentation will tell you the truth about forensic video analysis and provide a summary of all the steps needed to get evidence out of the source (typically a digital video recorder), extract parts of interest, forensically enhance them, take measurements, and prepare the results for presentation in the courtroom.


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Amped Software at Intersec 2016

This Saturday we will be at Intersec Dubai the world’s leading trade fair for Security, Safety and Fire Protection, together with our partner S.A.T.

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Show Dates: January 17 – 19, 2016 (Sunday – Tuesday)
Time: 10:00 am – 6:00 pm (Daily)
Venue: Halls 1 – 7, Trade Centre Arena and Sheikh Saeed Halls 1 – 3,
Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Centre – UAE

If you would like to visit us, please come by our booth and say hello or contact us for a more formal meeting!
The last show in January 2015 featured 1,234 exhibitors and welcomed more than 27,303 visitors from 118 countries which made it the largest Intersec of all times. If you are responsible for security or safety, Intersec is the must-attend event for you!

If you are a manufacturer or integrator of video surveillance systems, and you want to ensure that your video can be forensically examined, please stop by and see how we work with law enforcement to aid in the examination of your footage.

Body Worn Cameras (BWCs) as a Silver Bullet, Vol 4: Impact on Society

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In our previous posts, we have mainly focused on technical issues, but to do this topic justice, we need to address the social and ethical issues as well.

Trying to predict how the use of BWC technology will impact society and ethics, in general, is very difficult, but we can ask a few questions that can stimulate thought on the subject:

  • When should these cameras be deployed or how invasive should they be permitted to be?
  • Can an individual request the officer to turn off his camera in his own home or should the officer be allowed to overrule that choice if he feels it could provide a benefit in safety for one or both parties?
  • Would that individual be given access to that video? And if so, how will that data sharing take place and how much would it cost?
  • Will the police use of this technology set a social precedent and will we see this technology spread as a result?
  • How will access to all this data change the way we feel about privacy in general?

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Body Worn Cameras (BWCs) as a Silver Bullet, Vol 3: Storage

bodyworn-794100_640If we take volume 2 into account and apply correct scientific post-processing to our BWC footage, we now have usable video evidence but there are some further issues:

  • How will it be stored?
  • How much will that storage cost compare to the cost of not having this evidence?
  • What is the stance police departments will take on data protection and how will society respond to being further surveilled and having that surveillance stored?

This large-scale data collection has huge storage requirements, an example, pre BWC adoption: “In December 2012, IDC and EMC estimated the size of the digital universe (that is, all the digital data created, replicated and consumed in that year) to be 2,837 exabytes (EB) and forecast this to grow to 40,000EB by 2020 — a doubling time of roughly two years. One exabyte equals a thousand petabytes (PB), or a million terabytes (TB), or a billion gigabytes (GB). So by 2020, according to IDC and EMC, the digital universe will amount to over 5,200GB per person on the planet”. (Ref. http://www.zdnet.com/article/storage-in-2014-an-overview/) This is likely to increase as the BWC option becomes more widespread across the globe. Continue reading

Body Worn Cameras (BWCs) as a Silver Bullet, Vol 2: Quality

Volume 2 in our series on Body Worn Cameras.

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Let’s go through a thought experiment: we are a police officer about to enter into the pursuit of a suspect. Fortunately, in some cases we may not need to manually turn on our BWC because it has been programmed to do so upon sensing movement and other triggers. We begin running after the suspect and when we are close enough to the suspect we draw our service weapon and begin the process of arresting them.

Okay, how would this video look when viewed in court? First of all the video will be very shaky and due to the rolling shutter effect possibly distorted. “Rolling shutter is a method of image capture in which … each frame of a video (in a video camera) is captured not by taking a snapshot of the entire scene at single instant in time but rather by scanning across the scene rapidly, either vertically or horizontally. In other words, not all parts of the image of the scene are recorded at exactly the same instant”

 

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Body Worn Cameras (BWCs) as a Silver Bullet – An Article Series

We have created a series of articles regarding the main issues of Body Worn Cameras (BWCs) which we will publish in the next few weeks. Follow our blog to be updated with some of the concerns regarding this new digital evidence.

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In the digital forensics world, video evidence is nothing new and complex algorithmic analytical software has existed for many years working hard to process video footage into something presentable as evidence in court. If we think about how this situation will manifest after the inclusion of video data from BWCs we can identify that there will be a few key issues that need to be accounted for before BWCs become the solution everybody intends for them to be. These are footage integrity (compression and any lossy processing), stabilization of the footage (and other video enhancements), storage of the footage (HD video at h264 will require vast secure storage), law enforcement workflow, data protection and any social costs. While some of these technical issues can be corrected with software such as our Amped FIVE all of the other aspects are either very difficult or impossible to currently correct. In each volume in this series, we will look at an aspect or two in order to become informed on body worn cameras and their deployment, use, and effect.

Historically the main source of video evidence came from CCTV cameras, a static solution. The main issues with footage from CCTV cameras are resolution, compression (format is also an issue however easier to solve than the previous two) to which there is not really any software solution so the software focuses on things that can be solved in order to make the most of the data. These issues include motion and optical blurring, noise and stabilization as well as various environmental effects. With current BWCs recording in HD at 30FPS using current H.264 / AVC (Advanced Video Coding) we end up with much-improved source data than we were used to while working with CCTV.

However we should keep in mind that BWCs use a wide angle lens as well as compression, albeit a better one, and that will manifest as distortion from the wide angle lens and artifacts from the compression, making analysis difficult if not corrected.

Interestingly the secondary issues that we dealt with from CCTV footage have become the primary issues with the video from BWCs.

We now have BWC video evidence but how will it be stored, how much will that storage cost compared to the cost of not having this evidence, what is the stance on data protection and how will society respond to being further surveilled and having that surveillance stored?
There are also more complicated concerns that arise around the use of BWCs, from social issues such as privacy and data ownership/retrieval and ethical questions that the public are asking, to avoid tampering with evidence or the ability to circumvent the entire process to avoid the recording of evidence. Policy and BWC tech working in tandem with Cloud tech have made steps to address those concerns.

In the next post, we will go into detail with regards to BWC footage.