Supporting (Little) Women in Tech

Ada Lovelace, a gifted mathematician, is considered to have written instructions for the first computer program in the mid-1800s. Ada Lovelace’s contributions to the field of computer science were not discovered until the 1950s. Her notes were reintroduced to the world by B.V. Bowden, who republished them in Faster Than Thought: A Symposium on Digital Computing Machines in 1953. Since then, Ada has received many posthumous honors for her work. In 1980, the U.S. Department of Defense named a newly developed computer language “Ada,” after Lovelace.

Read her full biography here https://www.biography.com/people/ada-lovelace-20825323

In 1946 six brilliant young women programmed the first all-electronic, programmable computer, the ENIAC, a project run by the U.S. Army in Philadelphia as part of a secret World War II project. They learned to program without programming languages or tools (for none existed)—only logical diagrams. By the time they were finished, ENIAC ran a ballistics trajectory—a differential calculus equation—in seconds! Yet when the ENIAC was unveiled to the press and the public in 1946, the women were never introduced; they remained invisible.

For more info read here: http://eniacprogrammers.org/

Yet, according to research, women make up a very small percentage of today’s software developers and leaders in the tech sector.

To help raise awareness of the low number of females in this industry and to encourage more women, starting at a young age, to enter the tech world, Amped Software is supporting a local project entitled “Piccole Donne del Coding” (Little Women of Code) to teach very young women, from age 5-7, to develop skills in computational thinking, using logic to solve problems unplugged – without the use of a computer, but through play and creative activities.

You never know – one or more of these little women may one day be a future Ampedeer!

For more info about the project visit: https://www.thecodingbox.com/piccole-donne-del-coding