Monthly Archives: December 2017

We’ve had a great year and hope you have too!

Wishing you a Happy New Year

from everyone at Amped Software!

We’ve had a great year and hope you have too!

Look at what we accomplished in 2017:

Thank you to all our customers, partners and friends for believing in us and trusting our products to help you solve your cases and keep our communities safe.

We look forward to seeing you again in 2018!

Why investigating digital video is such a ‘huge pain in the proverbial’

With CCTV probably being the number one piece of digital evidence used in cases, many officers will have asked questions like, how do I get the footage; why is it not playing; or how can I get an image? It’s important therefore to understand why we have ended up here. Why digital video, specifically from the surveillance industry, is such a huge pain in the proverbial!

As computers and digital video started to creep into normality, the surveillance companies started to think of ways to say, and prove, that they were better than the other. One of the easiest ways to do this was to use a bespoke recording method and format, to suggest that it was better than the other. This is where it starts to go pear-shaped.

Very quickly we ended up with non-standard video files, requiring a player that could not install on a Force computer, with no method to interrogate, analyze, validate or process the evidence as required by the investigation.

It has been nearly 20 years since the start of Digital Video Recorders, and you will be glad to hear that things are improving. But, it is going to take a long time for many of these poor systems to get replaced by ones that are fit for purpose.

Read the full article published on Police Oracle.

It’s time to get real about fake imagery

As technology has enabled mainstream, widespread image manipulation, it is not surprising that there has been a huge increase in the number of tampered images which find their way into a wide spectrum of industries and sectors. Incidents of doctored images frequently appear in mainstream media where they incite cries of “fake news”.

For example, a photo at the G20 summit this year featured a photoshopped president Putin, giving the impression that he was colluding with president Donald Trump.  The photo proceeded to spread like wildfire across the internet, instigating huge political ramifications from a digital fabrication which would have taken a few minutes to create on a laptop. Last August also showed our vulnerability to tampered photos, with the circulation of a photoshopped image of a shark swimming up the freeway during hurricane Harvey indicating a larger problem with major international news outlets spreading the image as genuine.

Equally there is significant evidence of doctored images being used to support fraudulent scientific research internationally. Doctored experiment results and images continue to rock the research industry with every new fraudulent revelation.   A prominent cancer research scientist in Italy has been under investigation for using a photography studio to manipulate images pivotal to the crux of the “ground breaking” research. Indeed, the journal Nature has suggested that up to 1 in 5 scientific papers contain evidence of some sort of manipulation.

It is clear therefore, that when the stakes are high enough, people will manipulate the truth, and unfortunately given our tendency to trust photographic images, it seems that it is currently worth their while to do so. When the stakes are as high as imprisonment, it is easy to see how tempting it may be to manipulate an image to support an alibi or a particular version of events.

Unfortunately, security investigations are by no means immune to this phenomenon either. In fact, given the increase in the sources of digital images, the integrity of evidence in such investigations is at its all-time most vulnerable. Body worn cameras, smart phones and increasingly sophisticated CCTV surveillance means that investigators are now dealing with a fast-growing pile of unverified evidence.

Read the full article published in The Intersec Journal of International Security.

Amped Software is one of EMEA’s Fastest-Growing Technology Companies

We are proud to announce that Amped Software ranked on the Deloitte Technology Fast 500 EMEA.

The Deloitte Technology Fast 500 program, now in its seventeenth year, is an objective
industry ranking that recognizes the fastest-growing technology companies in EMEA. This
year’s list featured 18 countries, including Belgium, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the
Netherlands, Turkey and the UK. This year’s winners were selected based on percentage
fiscal-year revenue growth from 2013 to 2016. Amped Software placed 5th in the local
ranking of the fastest growing technology companies in Italy.

“As founder of Amped Software, I am really proud that we have been acknowledged as
one of EMEA’s and Italy’s fastest growing companies in 2017. When I started the
company, I set a single objective: to develop the worldwide industry leading software for all
image and video processing needs for forensics and investigations,” said Amped Software
Founder and CEO, Martino Jerian. “The challenge was to create something unique for a
very specific type of client, aiming to be the best in the world. It was a very ambitious goal
and certainly a bit crazy, but clear and simple. And here we are today! A big thank you to
the team that believed in my vision and allowed me to develop it to the fullest.” Continue reading

Investigating Image Authenticity

This article, published in Evidence Technology Magazine, takes a look at two cases involving the authentication of digital images and the importance of the questions asked of the analyst during those investigations. It looks at how authentication software, such as Amped Authenticate has been designed with a structured workflow, to locate the puzzle pieces required to assist in answering those questions.

Read the full article here.

Only a matter of time until fake evidence leads to false convictions

With the rise of the digital age can experts trust that photographic evidence is legitimate?

Sophie Garrod, from Police Oracle, writes about how a growing number of forensic and counter-terrorism units are getting on board with pioneering image authentication software.

Approximately a third of UK forces have invested in Amped Software products – including Amped Authenticate, an all in one computer programme which can detect doctored images.

Forensic image departments, counter-terrorism units, and government departments say they are saving time and money by sending detectives on a short training course in the software.

Read the full article here to learn more.

Retrieving Evidence from CCTV

Acquiring evidence from a digital camera or a smartphone is more or less relatively easy to do. Images are usually in standard JPEG format and videos in MP4 or some other format that most players can read. But what is the best way to retrieve and handle CCTV footage to ensure it stands up to the scrutiny in the courtroom? There are numerous possibilities and it depends on where the video is actually recorded.

To learn more, read the article by Martino Jerian, Amped CEO and Founder, published in Lawyer Monthly.

Come see us at the WIFS event in Rennes France

The Amped Software team is in Rennes France this week for the 9th IEEE International Workshop on Information Forensics and Security (WIFS) 2017. 

WIFS is the primary annual event organised by the IEEE Information Forensics and Security (IFS) Technical Committee of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. Its major objective is to bring together researchers from relevant disciplines to exchange new ideas and the latest results and to discuss emerging challenges in different areas of information security.

WIFS 2017 will feature keynote lectures, tutorials, and technical sessions. Topics of interest broadly include (but are not limited to): Forensics Analysis, Biometrics, Secure Communication, Multimedia Security, Information Theoretic Security, Cybersecurity, Hardware Security, Surveillance, Network Security, Applied Cryptography (See the Program of the week).

WIFS is one of the highest level conferences worldwide in the field of image authentication. Given that everything we do is backed by science, and that all new features and tools are based on scientific research, it’s very important for us to be present at events like this and also to be a sponsor of this event.

Amped Software is having a demo session today on Forensic Image and Video Enhancement and Authentication.

If you missed it, don’t worry! We will be around all day today and tomorrow too.

See you there!

Amped DVRConv Update 10098: more formats, more speed, more options

Today we released an update to Amped DVRConv, the easiest way to convert videos from proprietary DVR formats.

We have been working on this update for some time and a few users have received beta updates in order to support formats that were urgently required. During this period we have re-engineered a good part of the architecture to improve stability, speed and format compatibility.

Continue reading

The Amped FIVE Assistant Video Tutorial

We recently announced the release of the latest version of Amped FIVE (10039) where we introduced a new operational mode through a panel called the “Assistant”.

The Assistant provides a set of predefined workflows which can be used to automate common operations or guide new users, but it’s not obtrusive. You can use it or not, and you can always add filters or do anything, as usual, it’s just an additional option.

We’ve created a video tutorial so you can see it in action. See below or watch on YouTube now!

We’ll be adding more videos to our YouTube channel soon, so follow us to get more videos like this.